Water Use Licence Applications

Water Use Licence Applications

Water Use Authorizations is required in terms of Section 40 of the National Water Act. The Water Use Licence process consist of 3 distinct processes, namely:

  • The Water Use Licence Application, a document that contains all the completed Licence Application Forms (the DW forms), an copy of the receipt and other required documents (Title deeds, copies of Identity Documents and relevant agreements), as well as the Section 27 motivation.
  • The Technical Supporting Document. Depending on the specific water use applied for, this techincal supporting document have a different format, containing different information. This may be as simle as a Section 21(a) application, or as complex as a Section 21(f), (g) or (c)/(i) application. Frequently, there are more water uses relevant, that need to be addressed in one document, at the same time defining the impact that the various water uses may have on other water users in the area. This document may include an EIA or Scoping section, and ERA (Environmental Risk Assessment), Cost Benefit Analysis, Monitoring and Management Plans and Strategies, and should be in line with the regional Catchment Management Plan. Also known as Integrated Water Resource Management Plans or Integrated Water and Waste Management Plans.
  • The Water Use Licence and Technical Motivation document. While this is normally completed by the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry, lack of resources frequently result in delays. By compiling these documents as per the departments requirements, another hurdle is crossed in the issuence of a Water Use Authorization.

Whether required to facilitate the whole process, or just assist in either one of these processes, MENCO have considerate experience in all these facets of Water Use Licencing.

Example of completed projects

Various. See also our project page

Basic Assessments

Basic Assessments

A Basic Assessment is effectively an small Environmental Impact Assessment, sometimes supported by one or more specialist studies.

As with the EIA, the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism has furthermore, published, in Government Notice No. R. 386 of 2006, a list of activities identified in terms of section 24(2)(a) and (d) of the Act, which may not commence without environmental authorisation from the competent authority and in respect of which the investigation, assessment and communication of potential impact of activities must follow the procedure as described in regulations 22 to 26 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006, promulgated in terms of section 24(5) of the Act.

Example of completed projects

Various. See also our project page.

Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA)

Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA)

An (EIA) is an assessment of the possible impact–positive or negative–that a proposed project may have on the natural environment. The purpose of the assessment is to ensure that decision makers consider environmental impacts used to decided whether to proceed with the project. The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) defines an environmental impact assessment as “the process of identifying, predicting, evaluating and mitigating the biophysical, social, and other relevant effects of development proposals prior to major decisions being taken and commitments made. After an EIA, the precautionary and polluter pays principles may be applied to prevent, limit, or require strict liability or insurance coverage to a project, based on its likely harms.

The Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism has in terms of section 24(5), read with section 44 of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No.1 07 of 1998) (“the Act`), made the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006, published in Government Notice No. R. 385 of 21 April 2006. The Minister has furthermore, published, in Government Notice No. R. 387 of 21 April 2006, a list of activities identified in terms of section 24(2)(a) and (d) of the Act, which may not commence without environmental authorisation from the competent authority and in respect of which the investigation, assessment and communication of potential impact of activities must follow the procedure as described in regulations 27 to 36 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006, promulgated in terms of section 24(5) of the Act.

Example of completed projects

  • The Skychrome project inlcuded a full EIA.
  • EIA for the Tiegerpoort subdivision
Noise Impact Assessments

Noise Impact Assessments

We have developed a model inhouse that can address not only more than one point noise sources, but at the same time calculate the impact due to traffic, as well as the mitigation afforded by barriers and the housing of noise sources. By changing the approach to noise modeling, we have managed to prove to our clients that different options have different impacts on stakeholders, assisting them to identify appropriate management and/or alternative options that would minimize the impact on potential affected parties.

Example of completed projects

  • Skychrome Noise Impact Assessment (see Appendices).
  • Noise Impact Assessment for the update of the EMPR for Mooinooi Chrome Mine